Barrett's Esophagus.  El Salvador Atlas of Gastrointestinal VideoEndoscopy. A Large Database of Images and Video Clips with Cases Reported.
El Salvador Atlas of Gastrointestinal VideoEndoscopy
Barrett's Esophagus of long segment. A 66 year-old male with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease. Barrett's esophagus is a condition in which an abnormal columnar epithelium replaces the stratified squamous epithelium that normally lines the distal esophagus. It is the most severe histologic consequence of chronic gastroesophageal reflux and predisposes to the development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Endoscopically obvious Barrett's esophagus can be seen in 3 to 12 percent of patients who have endoscopic examinations for symptoms of GERD.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 1 of 24.

 Barrett's Esophagus of long segment.

 A 66 year-old male with chronic gastroesophageal reflux
 disease.
 Barrett's esophagus is a condition in which an abnormal
 columnar epithelium replaces the stratified squamous
 epithelium that normally lines the distal esophagus. It is the
 most severe histologic consequence of chronic
 gastroesophageal reflux and predisposes to the
 development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.

 Endoscopically obvious Barrett's esophagus can be seen in
 3 to 12 percent of patients who have endoscopic
 examinations for symptoms of GERD.

                                          Medline.

 For more endoscopic details, download the video clip by
 clicking on the endoscopic image. Wait to be downloaded
 complete then Press Alt and Enter for full screen. All
 endoscopic images shown in this Atlas contain video clips.
 We recommend seeing the video clips in full screen mode.

Barrett's Esophagus with residual islands of squamous epithelium. Squamous islands are frequently visualized at the time of upper endoscopy in patients with Barrett's esophagus, especially those on proton pump inhibitor therapy (PPI). Barrett's esophagus is usually discovered during endoscopic examinations of middle-aged and older adults whose mean age at the time of diagnosis is approximately 55 years old. Although Barrett's esophagus can affect children, it rarely occurs before the age of five. The definition of Barrett esophagus has evolved considerably over the past 100 years. In 1906, Tileston, a pathologist, described several patients with "peptic ulcer of the esophagus" in which the epithelium around the ulcer closely resembled that normally found in the stomach. The debate for the next 4 decades centered on the anatomical origin of this mucosal anomaly. Many investigators, including Barrett in his treatise published in 1950,  supported the view that this ulcerated columnar-lined organ was, in fact, the stomach tethered within the chest by a congenitally short esophagus.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 2 of 24.

 Barrett's Esophagus with residual islands of squamous
 epithelium.

 Squamous islands are frequently visualized at the time of
 upper endoscopy in patients with Barrett's esophagus,
 especially those on proton pump inhibitor therapy (PPI).

 Barrett's esophagus is usually discovered during
 endoscopic examinations of middle-aged and older adults
 whose mean age at the time of diagnosis is
 approximately 55 years old. Although Barrett's esophagus
 can affect children, it rarely occurs before the age of five.
 The definition of Barrett esophagus has evolved
 considerably over the past 100 years. In 1906, Tileston, a
 pathologist, described several patients with "peptic ulcer of
 the esophagus" in which the epithelium around the ulcer
 closely resembled that normally found in the stomach. The
 debate for the next 4 decades centered on the anatomical
 origin of this mucosal anomaly. Many investigators,
 including Barrett in his treatise published in 1950,
 supported the view that this ulcerated columnar-lined organ
 was, in fact, the stomach tethered within the chest by a
 congenitally short esophagus.

 

Barrett's Esophagus retroflexed view. The columnar metaplasia in Barrett's esophagus causes no symptoms. Thus, most patients are seen initially for symptoms of the associated GERD such as heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia.                                                                                   Norman Barrett, a British surgeon, is widely believed to be the first to describe the transformation of the esophageal lining that bears his name. In a landmark paper in 1950. Barrett noted ulcers in a tubular, intrathoracic organ that appeared to be the esophagus but was lined by gastric-type columnar epithelium. Barrett argued (in retrospect, incorrectly) that this was a segment of stomach that had become tethered in the chest because of a congenitally short squamous-lined esophagus.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 3 of 24.

 Barrett's Esophagus retroflexed view.

 The columnar metaplasia in Barrett's esophagus causes no
 symptoms. Thus, most patients are seen initially for
 symptoms of the associated GERD such as heartburn,
 regurgitation, and dysphagia.

 Norman Barrett, a British surgeon, is widely believed to be
 the first to describe the transformation of the esophageal
 lining that bears his name. In a landmark paper in 1950.
 Barrett noted ulcers in a tubular, intrathoracic organ that
 appeared to be the esophagus but was lined by gastric-type
 columnar epithelium.
 Barrett argued (in retrospect, incorrectly) that this was a
 segment of stomach that had become tethered in the chest
 because of a congenitally short squamous-lined esophagus.

More images and video clips of Barrettīs Esophagus.  Several tongues of gastric-appearing mucosa extend above the esophagogastric junction into the distal esophagus.  Squamous islands may be remnants of squamous mucosa or originate from esophageal gland duct epithelium following injury.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 4 of 24.

 More images and video clips of Barrettīs Esophagus.
 Several tongues of gastric-appearing mucosa extend above
 the esophagogastric junction into the distal esophagus.
 Squamous islands may be remnants of squamous mucosa
 or originate from esophageal gland duct epithelium
 following injury.

Residual islands of squamous epithelium. Definition of Barrett's Esophagus -- Barrett's esophagus is a change in the esophageal epithelium of any length that can be recognized at endoscopy and is confirmed to have intestinal metaplasia by biopsy.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 5 of 24.

 Residual islands of squamous epithelium.

 
Definition of Barrett's Esophagus -- Barrett's esophagus is a
 change in the esophageal epithelium of any length that can be
 recognized at endoscopy and is confirmed to have intestinal
 metaplasia by biopsy.

 

The video clip shows the reflux evidence due to the fact that gastric juice emerging to the esophagus.Barrett's esophagus is an acquired condition resulting from severe esophageal mucosal injury. It still remains unclear why some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease develop Barrett's esophagus whereas others do not. The diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus is established if the squamocolumnar junction is displaced proximal to the gastroesophageal junction and if intestinal metaplasia is detected by biopsy. Despite this seemingly simple definition, diagnostic inconsistencies remain a problem, especially in distinguishing short segment Barrett's esophagus from intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia. Barrett's esophagus would be of little importance were it not for its well-recognized association with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma continues to increase and the5-year survival rate for this cancer remains dismal.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 6 of 24.

 The video clip shows the reflux evidence due to the fact
 that gastric juice emerging to the esophagus.
 

 Falk GW. Gastroenterology. 2002 May;122(6):1569-91.
 Barrett's esophagus is an acquired condition resulting from severe
 esophageal mucosal injury. It still remains unclear why some
 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease develop Barrett's
 esophagus whereas others do not. The diagnosis of Barrett's
 esophagus is established if the squamocolumnar junction is
 displaced proximal to the gastroesophageal junction and if
 intestinal metaplasia is detected by biopsy. Despite this seemingly
 simple definition, diagnostic inconsistencies remain a problem,
 especially in distinguishing short segment Barrett's esophagus from
 intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia. Barrett's esophagus
 would be of little importance were it not for its well-recognized
 association with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. The incidence
 of esophageal adenocarcinoma continues to increase and the
 5-year survival rate for this cancer remains dismal.

 Enhanced magnification endoscopy. Zoom endoscopy of a tongue of Barretts mucosa showing cerebriform villous architecture.  Enhanced magnification endoscopy. The endoscopic classification of Barretts esophagus is based on the similarities between the intestinal metaplasia found in the esophagus of patients with Barretts and the intestinal mucosa seen in the duodenum of patients with celiac sprue using dissecting microscopy. Zoom endoscopy has the potential to enhance diagnostic yield by improving targeting of biopsies. Enhanced magnification endoscopy involves the combined use of magnification endoscopy and acetic acid. Barrett's mucosa is frequently translucent when observed with magnification endoscopy. To improve the visualization of the mucosal surface, a variety of different enhancement techniques, including both stains and acetic acid, have been used in conjunction with magnification. The use of 1.5% to 3% acetic acid in the distal esophagus has been shown to enhance the ability to visualize the small details of the mucosal surface. This method is safe, rapid, clean, and inexpensive.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 7 of 24.

 Zoom endoscopy of a tongue of Barretts mucosa showing
 cerebriform villous architecture.


 
Enhanced magnification endoscopy.

 The endoscopic classification of Barretts esophagus is
 based on the similarities between the intestinal metaplasia
 found in the esophagus of patients with Barretts and the
 intestinal mucosa seen in the duodenum of patients with
 celiac sprue using dissecting microscopy.
 
Zoom endoscopy has the potential to enhance diagnostic
 yield by improving targeting of biopsies.
 
 
Enhanced magnification endoscopy involves the combined
 use of magnification endoscopy and acetic acid. Barrett's
 mucosa is frequently translucent when observed with
 magnification endoscopy. To improve the visualization of
 the mucosal surface, a variety of different enhancement
 techniques, including both stains and acetic acid, have been
 used in conjunction with magnification. The use of 1.5% to
 3% acetic acid in the distal esophagus has been shown
to
 enhance the ability to visualize the small details of the
 mucosal surface. This method is safe, rapid, clean, and
 inexpensive.
               
                                            
                                         
Medline.

Tongue of Barretts mucosa showing cerebriform villous architecture. The salmon-colored mucosa in the distal esophagus is columnar and consists of a mosaic of fundic mucosa, cardiac mucosa, and  intestinal metaplasia. The yield of intestinal metaplasia from biopsies of columnar-type mucosa in the distal esophagus varies from 25% to 50% in short-segment Barretts esophagus to 80% in longsegment Barretts esophagus. Ideally, a method that improves the visualization of the mucosal surface would aid in the detection of Barretts esophagus and assist in more accurate surveillance. Magnification endoscopy with chromoendoscopy provides a unique approach with a more specific evaluation of the fine details of the mucosal surface and high-yield targeted biopsies for a more accurate diagnosis.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 8 of 24.

 Tongue of Barretts mucosa showing cerebriform villous
 architecture.
 The salmon-colored mucosa in the distal esophagus is
 columnar and consists of a mosaic of fundic mucosa,
 cardiac mucosa, and intestinal metaplasia. The yield of
 intestinal metaplasia from biopsies of columnar-type
 mucosa in the distal esophagus varies from 25% to 50% in
 short-segment Barretts esophagus to 80% in longsegment
 Barretts esophagus. Ideally, a method that improves the
 visualization of the mucosal surface would aid in the
 detection of
Barretts esophagus and assist in more accurate
 surveillance. Magnification endoscopy with
 chromoendoscopy provides a unique approach with a more
 specific
evaluation of the fine details of the mucosal surface
 and high-yield targeted biopsies for a more accurate
 diagnosis.

Chromoendoscopy using methylene blue. Chromoendoscopy involves the topical application of stains or dyes to improve mucosal visualization during endoscopy.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 9 of 24.

 Chromoendoscopy using methylene blue.

 Chromoendoscopy involves the topical application of stains
 or dyes to improve mucosal visualization during endoscopy.





                                           Medline.

Argon Plasma Coagulator (APC).  The image and the video clip display, the violet light of the APC. Studies have demonstrated reversal of Barrett's mucosa after endoscopic coagulation with different techniques associated with acid inhibition. However, most of these studies have shown that residual Barrett's glands are found underneath the new squamous epithelium in up to 40% of patients. but using High power setting argon plasma coagulation is most promising.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 10 of 24.

Argon Plasma Coagulator (APC).

 The image and the video clip display, the violet light of the
 APC.
 Studies have demonstrated reversal of Barrett's mucosa
 after endoscopic coagulation with different techniques
 associated with acid inhibition. However, most of these
 studies have shown that residual Barrett's glands are found
 underneath the new squamous epithelium in up to 40% of
 patients. but using high power setting argon plasma
 coagulation is most promising.


 
                                          Medline.

Argon Plasma Coagulator (APC). Patients with Barrett's esophagus have a 30- to 125-fold increased risk of the development of esophageal cancer in comparison with the general population. The disease is most common in white males.                                                                                                                                                    Another image and video clip of the APC.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 11 of 24.

Another image and video clip of the APC.

 Patients with Barrett's esophagus have a 30- to 125-fold
 increased risk of the development of esophageal cancer in
 comparison with the general population. The disease is
 most common in white males.

                                         

                                          Medline.

Appearance post using the argon plasma coagulator. Optical methods either alone or in combination with chromoendoscopy are likely to hold the key to better targeting, to increase biopsy yield in Barrett's esophagus and in some other disorders of the GI tract.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 12 of 24.

Appearance post using the argon plasma coagulator.

 Optical methods either alone or in combination with
 chromoendoscopy
are likely to hold the key to better
 targeting, to increase
biopsy yield in Barrett’s esophagus
 and in some other disorders of
the GI tract.

Appearance post using the argon plasma coagulator. For methylene blue staining, the patient should be told that the urine and stool might adopt a blue color.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 13 of 24.

Appearance post using the argon plasma coagulator.

 For methylene blue staining, the patient should be told that
 the urine and stool might adopt a blue color.

 

magnification of the tissue that have been coagulated.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 14 of 24.

 The image and the video clip shows magnification of the
 tissue that have coagulated.  

One month after the therapy with argon plasma coagulator APC.  An endoscopic follow up. Note that the long segments of the Barrett have been diminished.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 15 of 24.

 One month after the therapy with argon plasma coagulator
 APC. An endoscopic follow up.
 Note that the long segments of the Barrett have been
 diminished.

A hiatus hernia with complete incompetence of the sphincter is observed.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 16 of 24.

 A hiatus hernia with complete incompetence of the
 sphincter is observed.

 

One month after the therapy with argon plasma coagulator APC.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 17 of 24.

 One month after the therapy with argon plasma coagulator
 APC.

Chromoendoscopy using Lugol's solution. Chromoendoscopy involves the application of vital dyes that enhance the visibility of dysplastic mucosa. Vital dyes that have been studied include those that preferentially stain normal squamous mucosa (such as Lugol's iodine), Diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is usually late. Staining of the mucosa with Lugol's solution during endoscopy has been suggested to identify early cancer and dysplasia that may improve prognosis.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 18 of 24.

Chromoendoscopy using Lugol's solution.

 Chromoendoscopy involves the application of vital dyes
 that enhance the visibility of dysplastic mucosa. Vital dyes
 that have been studied include those that preferentially
 stain normal squamous mucosa (such as Lugol's iodine),

 
Diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is
 usually late. Staining of the mucosa with Lugol's solution
 during endoscopy has been suggested to identify early
 cancer and dysplasia that may improve prognosis.

Chromoendoscopy using Lugol's solution. Endoscopic techniques to detect dysplasia.  Several endoscopic techniques that could augment the ability to detect dysplasia have been evaluated. These include chromoendoscopy, magnification endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence detection techniques. Lugol's staining have suggested that it may be helpful for detection of high grade dysplasia and early squamous cell cancers of the esophagus.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 19 of 24.

 Endoscopic techniques to detect dysplasia. Several
 
endoscopic techniques that could augment the ability to
 detect dysplasia have been evaluated. These include
 chromoendoscopy, magnification endoscopy, endoscopic
 ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and
 fluorescence detection techniques.

 Lugol's staining have suggested that it may be helpful for
 detection of high grade dysplasia and early squamous cell
 cancers of the esophagus.

High power setting argon plasma coagulation. One month of the previous therapy another endoscopic session with APC. In this endoscopy we used a double-channel endoscope and APC catheter of 3.2 mm. The management of patients with Barrett's esophagus involves three major components. Treatment of the associated gastroesophageal reflux Endoscopic surveillance to detect dysplasia Treatment of dysplasia.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 20 of 24.

High power setting argon plasma coagulation.

 One month of the previous therapy another endoscopic
 session with APC.
 In this endoscopy we used a
double-channel endoscope
 and APC catheter of 3.2 mm.


 The management of patients with Barrett's esophagus
 involves three major components.

 
Treatment of the associated gastroesophageal reflux

 Endoscopic surveillance to detect dysplasia
 Treatment of dysplasia.

High power setting argon plasma coagulation.  APC treatment of Barrett's esophagus is simple, efficacious and safe. Reversal of Barrett's mucosa can be achieved by a few endoscopic sessions. But long term follow-up studies on many patients are necessary to establish the frequency of endoscopic surveillance on the basis of recurrence or dysplasia evolution risk, in spite of APC treatment.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 21 of 24

 APC treatment of Barrett's esophagus is simple, efficacious
 and safe. Reversal of Barrett's mucosa can be achieved by
 a few endoscopic sessions. But long term follow-up studies
 on many patients are necessary to establish the frequency
 of endoscopic surveillance on the basis of recurrence or
 dysplasia evolution risk, in spite of APC treatment.

High power setting argon plasma coagulation.                                                                    Most patients with BE will not develop esophageal cancer and will die of other causes, as in the general population. The risk of progression to adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is estimated at approximately 0.5% per year in patients without dysplasia on initial surveillance biopsies. Why only some people with GERD develop BE also is not clear.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 22 of 24.

The image and the video clip display the APC ablation.
 

 Most patients with BE will not develop esophageal cancer
 and will die of other causes, as in the general population.
 The risk of progression to adenocarcinoma of the
 esophagus is estimated at approximately 0.5% per year in
 patients without dysplasia on initial surveillance biopsies.

 Why only some people with GERD develop BE also is not
 clear.

Alcian Blue Stains.  There is ectopic gastric mucosa with incomplete intestinal metaplasia , with goblet cells (alcian blue).  The diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus requires both endoscopic and histologic evidence of metaplastic columnar epithelium. Endoscopically, there must be columnar epithelium within the esophagus. Histologically, the epithelium must be metaplastic, as defined by the presence of goblet cells. An Alcian blue stain at pH 2.5 stains the acidic mucin present in the goblet cells.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 23 of 24.

Alcian Blue Stains.

 There is ectopic gastric mucosa with incomplete intestinal
 metaplasia , with goblet cells (alcian blue).

 The diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus requires both
 endoscopic and histologic evidence of metaplastic columnar
 epithelium. Endoscopically, there must be columnar
 epithelium within the esophagus. Histologically, the
 epithelium must be metaplastic, as defined by the presence
 of goblet cells. An Alcian blue stain at pH 2.5 stains the
 acidic mucin present in the goblet cells. The most common
 errors in the identification of goblet cells are:
 1) "pseudogoblet" cells; and 2) Alcian blue positive cells
 that are not goblet cells.
 Pseudogoblet cells are barrel-shaped gastric surface or
 foveolar cells that do not stain with Alcian blue. These cells
 commonly have a blush of eosinophilia, due to neutral
 mucin, on H&E stained sections, in contrast to the blush of
 basophilia, imparted by the acidic mucin in goblet cells.

 

Alcian Blue Stains. Alcian blue goblet cells are seen at the ectopic gastric mucosa. Specialized columnar epithelium characterized by alcian blue-positive and mucin-containing goblet cells. This type of epithelium is diagnostic of Barretts esophagus. Pseudogoblet cells are barrel-shaped gastric surface or foveolar cells that do not stain with Alcian blue. These cells commonly have a blush of eosinophilia, due to neutral mucin, on H&E stained sections, in contrast to the blush of basophilia, imparted by the acidic mucin in goblet cells. Alcian blue positivity in a columnar cell does not necessarily indicate a metaplastic goblet cell; it should have a barrel shape. Other types of cells that can be alcian blue positive but which lack the barrel shape include: reactive  gastric foveolar cells, which may be present in the pits and on the mucosal surface, mucous neck cells of the gastric  glands, esophageal cardiac glands, and submucosal glands in the esophagus.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 24 of 24.

Alcian Blue Stains.

 Alcian blue goblet cells are seen at the ectopic gastric
 mucosa.
 Specialized columnar epithelium characterized by alcian
 blue-positive and mucin-containing goblet cells. This type
 of epithelium is diagnostic of Barretts esophagus.

 Pseudogoblet cells are barrel-shaped gastric surface or
 foveolar cells that do not stain with Alcian blue. These cells
 commonly have a blush of eosinophilia, due to neutral
 mucin, on H&E stained sections, in contrast to the blush of
 basophilia, imparted by the acidic mucin in goblet cells.

 Alcian blue positivity in a columnar cell does not
 necessarily indicate a metaplastic goblet cell; it should have
 a barrel shape. Other types of cells that can be alcian blue
 positive but which lack the barrel shape include: reactive
 gastric foveolar cells, which may be present in the pits and
 on the mucosal surface, mucous neck cells of the gastric
 glands
, esophageal cardiac glands, and submucosal glands
 in the esophagus
.

This picture shows the differences between both mucosas of the gastroesophagic junction.


 High Magnification Video Endoscopy.

 This picture shows the differences between both mucosas
 of the gastroesophagic junction.

  BarrettNewsPaper

 

 Gastric Heterotopia (inlet pach).  Mucosal defect that has to disclosed Barrett Esophagus. A 50 year-old female with long-standing GERD. A hiatus hernia is seen.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 1 of 4.

 Gastric Heterotopia (inlet pach).

 Mucosal defect that has to disclosed Barrett Esophagus.
 A 50 year-old female with long-standing GERD.
 A hiatus hernia is seen.

Retilcular mucosa pattern sugestive of cardiac epithelium.  Magnification Endoscopy combined with Enhanced magnification. The image and the video clip display magnification endoscopy following instillation of acetid acid. The magnified image displays a retilcular mucosa pattern sugestive of cardiac epithelium (rather than intestinal metaplasia) which was confirmed on biopsy.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 2 of 4.

Magnification Endoscopy combined with Enhanced magnification.

 The image and the video clip display magnification
 endoscopy following instillation of acetid acid.
 The magnified image displays a retilcular mucosa pattern
 sugestive of cardiac epithelium (rather than intestinal
 metaplasia) which was confirmed on biopsy.

Magnification Endoscopy combined with enhanced magnification.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 3 of 4.

 Magnification Endoscopy combined with enhanced
 magnification.

 

Chromoendoscopy using methylene blue.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 4 of 4.

 Chromoendoscopy using methylene blue.

Barrett's Esophagus of long segment. This 41 year-old male presented with long-standing GERD. Endoscopy shows tongues of Barrett esophagus.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 1 of 11.

Barrett's Esophagus of long segment.

This 41 year-old male presented with long-standing GERD.
Endoscopy shows tongues of Barrett esophagus.
 

 People with "long-segment" Barrett's esophagus, in which the red lining is 3 cm or more in length, are about 40 times more likely than those in the general population to develop esophageal cancer. As a result, they typically undergo regular endoscopic screening and biopsies to ensure their condition has not progressed to cancer.  Substantially more common, however, is "short-segment" Barrett's, in which the patch of affected tissue is no more than 3 cm long. Until recently, esophageal-cancer risk in people with shorter segments was largely unknown because such patients often were excluded from studies because their condition was more difficult to diagnose through endoscopy, and because researchers initially were uncertain whether short-segment Barrett's indeed was a cancer risk factor at all.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 2 of 11.

 People with "long-segment" Barrett's esophagus, in
 which the red lining is 3 cm or more in length, are
 about 40 times more likely than those in the general
 population to develop esophageal cancer. As a result,
 they typically undergo regular endoscopic screening
 and biopsies to ensure their condition has not
 progressed to cancer.
 Substantially more common, however, is
 "short -segment" Barrett's, in which the patch of affected
 tissue is no more than 3 cm long. Until recently,
 esophageal-cancer risk in people with shorter
 segments was largely unknown because such
 patients often were excluded from studies because
 their condition was more difficult to diagnose through
 endoscopy, and because researchers initially were
 uncertain whether short-segment Barrett's indeed
 was a cancer risk factor at all.

Among patients who have endoscopic examinations because of chronic GERD symptoms, long segment Barrett's esophagus can be found in 3 to 5 percent, whereas 10 to 15 percent have short-segment Barrett's esophagus .

Video Endoscopic Sequence 3 of 11.

 Among patients who have endoscopic examinations
 because of chronic GERD symptoms, long segment
 Barrett's esophagus can be found in 3 to 5 percent, whereas
 10 to 15 percent have short-segment Barrett's esophagus.

 

 

Esophagectomy has been the treatment of choice for patients with Barrett's esophagus and HGD or adenocarcinoma. However, the reported morbidity and mortality rates for this indication are in the range of 18% to 48% and 3% to 5%, respectively. In view of these risks, a considerable proportion of patients are unable or unwilling to undergo surgery because of comorbidity or age. A recent large prospective trial showed that HGD in Barrett's esophagus follows a relatively benign course in the majority of patients.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 4 of 11.

 Esophagectomy has been the treatment of choice for
 patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia
 (HGD). or adenocarcinoma. However, the reported
 morbidity and mortality rates for this indication are in the
 range of 18% to 48% and 3% to 5%, respectively. In view
 of these risks, a considerable proportion of patients are
 unable or unwilling to undergo surgery because of
 comorbidity or age. A recent large prospective trial showed
 that HGD in Barrett's esophagus follows a relatively
 benign course in the majority of patients.

 

Ablative Therapy with APC.90 W. argon plasma coagulation (APC) for the ablation of Barrett's esophagus. Preliminary studies have demonstrated reversal of Barrett's mucosa after Endoscopic coagulation with different techniques associated with acid inhibition.  However, most of these studies have shown that residual Barrett's glands are found underneath the new squamous epithelium in up to 40% of patients.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 5 of 11.

Ablative Therapy with APC.

90 W. argon plasma coagulation (APC) for the ablation of Barrett's esophagus.

 Preliminary studies have demonstrated reversal of
 Barrett's mucosa after endoscopic coagulation with
 different techniques associated with acid inhibition.
 However, most of these studies have shown that residual
 Barrett's glands are found underneath the new squamous
 epithelium in up to 40% of patients.

The goal of ablative therapy is to destroy the Barrett epithelium to a sufficient depth to eliminate the intestinal metaplasia and allow regrowth of squamous epithelium. A number of modalities have been tried, usually in combination with medical or surgical therapy because successful ablation appears to require an anacid environment.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 6 of 11.

 The goal of ablative therapy is to destroy the Barrett
 epithelium to a sufficient depth to eliminate the intestinal
 metaplasia and allow regrowth of squamous epithelium. A
 number of modalities have been tried, usually in
 combination with medical or surgical therapy because
 successful ablation appears to require an anacid
 environment.
 

 

Human studies have been performed with photodynamic therapy (PDT), argon plasma coagulation (APC), multipolar electrocoagulation (MPEC), heater probes, and various forms of lasers, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation. Ablative therapy remains largely investigational with the exception of PDT, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for high-grade dysplasia only.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 7 of 11.

 Human studies have been performed with photodynamic
 therapy (PDT), argon plasma coagulation (APC), multipolar
 electrocoagulation (MPEC), heater probes, and various
 forms of lasers, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR),
 cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation. Ablative therapy
 remains largely investigational with the exception of PDT,
 which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration
 (FDA) for high-grade dysplasia only.

 

The long-term relapse rate of non-neoplastic BE following  complete ablation with high-power APC is low.       APC is a method of contact-free high-frequency current coagulation in which the burning of tissue stops as soon as the area is ablated. One recent study using high-power APC was reported to result in complete restoration of squamous mucosa in 33 out of 33 patients after a mean of 1.96 sessions. The major complication was chest pain and odynophagia, which occurred in 57.5% of patients and lasted 3-10 days. Only 3 patients experienced stricture, which was treated easily with dilation.  Other studies have been less encouraging, with persistence of residual foci of Barrett epithelium under the neosquamous lining in 22-29%, and deep esophageal ulceration with massive bleeding,

Video Endoscopic Sequence 8 of 11.

The long-term relapse rate of non-neoplastic BE following complete ablation with high-power APC is low.

 APC is a method of contact-free high-frequency current
 coagulation in which the burning of tissue stops as soon as
 the area is ablated. One recent study using high-power APC
 was reported to result in complete restoration of squamous
 mucosa in 33 out of 33 patients after a mean of 1.96
 sessions. The major complication was chest pain and
 odynophagia, which occurred in 57.5% of patients and
 lasted 3-10 days. Only 3 patients experienced stricture,
 which was treated easily with dilation.
 Other studies have been less encouraging, with persistence
 of residual foci of Barrett epithelium under the
 neosquamous lining in 22-29%, and deep esophageal
 ulceration with massive bleeding.

Final status, after the Argon plasma coagulation therapy.  Another area of intense research in the setting of BE is the study of biomarkers that may predict an increased risk of progression to cancer. 17p (p53) LOH (loss of heterozygosity) predicts progression of BE to cancer. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is able to detect simple deletion of DNA, but in a subset of patients with BE, 17p (p53) LOH may arise by mitotic recombination or other mechanisms that cannot be detected by FISH. LOH analysis is more complex and labor-intensive, whereas FISH technology is more readily available and can be performed by various clinical laboratories.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 9 of 11.

Final status, after the Argon plasma coagulation therapy.

 Another area of intense research in the setting of BE is the
 study of biomarkers that may predict an increased risk of
 progression to cancer. 17p (p53) LOH (loss of
 heterozygosity) predicts progression of BE to cancer.
 Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is able to detect
 simple deletion of DNA, but in a subset of patients with BE,
 17p (p53) LOH may arise by mitotic recombination or other
 mechanisms that cannot be detected by FISH. LOH
 analysis is more complex and labor-intensive, whereas
 FISH technology is more readily available and can be
 performed by various clinical laboratories.

Six months after, a follow up endoscopy was performed.  The tongues of Barrett epithelium have been shortened.                                                                                                                                                          Six months after, a follow up endoscopy was performed.  The tongues has been shortened.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 10 of 11.

Six months after, a follow up endoscopy was performed.

The tongues of Barrett epithelium have been shortened.

 

 

A new session of ablative therapy will be  needed.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 11 of 11.

A new session of ablative therapy will be needed.

 

 Barrett Esophagus. Tongue-like columnar mucosal protrusions in the distal esophagus. A 68 year-old, female with long standing GERD.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 1 of 6.

 Barrett Esophagus.

 Tongue-like columnar mucosal protrusions in the distal
 esophagus.

 A 68 year-old, female with long standing GERD.
 

More images and video clips of this endoscopic sequence.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 2 of 6.

More images and video clips of this endoscopic sequence.

 Barrett Esophagus. Retroflexed image.  The gastroesophagic junction is observed.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 3 of 6.

Retroflexed image.

 The gastroesophagic junction is observed.
 

 Barrett Esophagus. Vital staining with Lugol's solution is performed at the time of upper endoscopy to aid in cancer detection. Lugol's staining involves the application of a solution that contains potassium iodide and iodine through a spray catheter. The dye stains the glycogen in normal squamous epithelium a dark brown color. Areas that are unstained, particularly those that are larger than 5 mm in size, are likely to be dysplasic or malignant and can be readily targeted for endoscopic biopsy. Smaller unstained areas (less than 5 mm) may result from inflammatory change.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 4 of 6.

 Vital staining with Lugol's solution is performed at the time
 of upper endoscopy to aid in cancer detection. Lugol's
 staining involves the application of a solution that contains
 potassium iodide and iodine through a spray
catheter. The
 dye stains the glycogen in normal squamous epithelium a
 dark brown color. Areas that are unstained, particularly
 those that are larger than 5 mm in size, are likely to be
 dysplasic or malignant and can be readily targeted for
 endoscopic biopsy. Smaller unstained areas (less than 5
 mm) may result from inflammatory change.

 Barrett Esophagus.                                              Magnifying Endoscopy of gastroesophagic junction. For the surveillance of malignant lesions from Barrett's esophagus, periodic endoscopic examination is necessary with chromoendoscopy or magnifying endoscopy. Treatment strategies are EMR and other endoscopic treatment for mucosal cancer, and surgical treatment for submucosal and advanced cancer. Several surgical modalities are employed depending on the stage of cancerous progression, the location of the cancer in Barrett's esophagus, and the length of Barrett's esophagus.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 5 of 6.

Magnifying Endoscopy of gastroesophagic junction.

 For the surveillance of malignant lesions from Barrett's
 esophagus, periodic endoscopic examination is necessary
 with chromoendoscopy or magnifying endoscopy.
 Treatment strategies are EMR and other endoscopic
 treatment for mucosal cancer, and surgical treatment for
 submucosal and advanced cancer. Several surgical
 modalities are employed depending on the stage of
 cancerous progression, the location of the cancer in
 Barrett's esophagus, and the length of Barrett's esophagus.

 

Chromoendoscopy using methylene blue. It is believed that adenocarcinoma develops only in epithelium containing specialized intestinal metaplasia.  Therefore, investigators have focused on the utility of chromoendoscopy in identifying these areas of intestinal metaplasia for biopsy. Within this setting, showed that methylene blue, selectively stained specialized intestinal metaplasia in Barrett's esophagus, with excellent specificity and sensitivity.

Video Endoscopic Sequence 6 of 6.

 Chromoendoscopy using methylene blue.

 It is believed that adenocarcinoma develops only in
 epithelium containing specialized intestinal metaplasia.
 Therefore, investigators have focused on the utility of
 chromoendoscopy in identifying these areas of intestinal
 metaplasia for biopsy. Within this setting, showed that
 methylene blue, selectively stained specialized intestinal
 metaplasia in Barrett's esophagus, with excellent
 specificity and sensitivity.